Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Page: 338-343
Male Involvement in Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV and Associated Factors Among Males in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Yohannes Abuhay, Addis Ababa City Health Bureau, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Lakew Abebe, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Netsanet Fentahun, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Received: Oct. 4, 2014;       Accepted: Oct. 16, 2014;       Published: Oct. 30, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20140206.13      View  2951      Downloads  197
Abstract
Background: The importance of male involvement in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission programs is incremental to maintain family health and adherence to human immunodeficiency virus treatment and prevention regimens. Globally, male involvement has been recognized as a priority focus area to be strengthened in prevention of mother-to-child transmission but, it remains a challenge in most low- and middle-income countries including Ethiopia. Objective: To assess male involvement in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and associated factors among male partners in Addis Ababa. Methods: A Community based cross-sectional study supplemented with qualitative method was conducted from October 1-November 30, 2013 at sixteen districts in Addis Ababa. A total of 431 male participants were involved in the study. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 statistical package. Multiple logistic regressions analysis was used to identify the predictors of male involvement. Qualitative data were analyzed manually using thematic approach. Result: One hundred ninety six (45.5%) of respondents were in the age group of 35-44 years. Three hundred thirty two (77%) of the participants were knowledgeable about mother-to-child transmission of HIV. From the total respondents, only 121(28.1%) of males had high involvement in PMTCT. Knowledge, income, cultural beliefs, and occupation of the participants were significantly predictor of males’ involvement in the Prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Conclusion: Knowledge, occupational status, income and cultural barriers to males’ involvement in the Prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV in Addis Ababa were deterrent and interrelated. Therefore, a potential need to be invested on the components attributable to those independent factors of male involvement there by aware, support empower them towards effective involvement in Prevention of mother to child transmission interventions.
Keywords
Men’s Involvement, Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV
To cite this article
Yohannes Abuhay, Lakew Abebe, Netsanet Fentahun, Male Involvement in Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV and Associated Factors Among Males in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 338-343. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20140206.13
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