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Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Page: 19-24
Spectrum of Uropathogens and Antimicrobial Susceptibility in Clinically Diagnosed Cases of Urinary Tract Infection in the Bamenda Regional Hospital, Cameroon
Marie Ebob Agbortabot Bissong, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bamenda, Bamenda, Cameroon; Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Science and Technology, North West University, Mafikeng, South Africa
Carlson Mbah, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bamenda, Bamenda, Cameroon
Frank Eric Tatsing Foka, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Science and Technology, North West University, Mafikeng, South Africa
Henri-Lucien Kamga, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bamenda, Bamenda, Cameroon
Received: Dec. 8, 2016;       Accepted: Jan. 9, 2017;       Published: Mar. 2, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20170502.11      View  2031      Downloads  162
Abstract
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the common bacterial infections in humans both in the community and hospital settings. In spite of the availability and use of antimicrobial drugs, UTIs have shown increasing trends in recent years. Antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens is a serious health threat as this may complicate treatment, eventually resulting to more severe disease. Despite the importance of UTI, there is paucity of information on the aetiology of this disease especially in the Northwest Region. For that reason, the present study was designed with the aim to determine the spectrum of uropathogens and antimicrobial resistance of isolates in cases of symptomatic bacteriuria. To achieve this goal, midstream urine specimens were inoculated unto CLED media and isolates were identified using the Enterosystem 18R. Significant bacteriuria was considered with bacterial growth of ≥105 CFU/ml. Susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method and the accuracy of the dipstick test was determined using culture as a gold standard. Significant bacteriuria was observed in 50% of the participants and the predominant uropathogens isolated were P. aeruginosa (22.4%), Klebsiella spp (14.3%), S. aureus (14.3%), CNS (14.3%) and E. coli (12.2%). High resistance (80-98%) among uropathogens was observed against clindamycin, amoxicillin and doxycycline. For the dipstick test, leucocyte esterase and nitrite showed high sensitivity (93.9%) and specificity (100%) respectively, for detecting UTI. The results of this study highlights the importance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the aetiology of both community and hospital acquired UTIs. In addition, gentamicin is the most effective agent against uropathogens in the study area.
Keywords
UTI, Symptomatic Bacteriuria, Aetiology, Screening Methods, Antimicrobial Resistance, Cameroon
To cite this article
Marie Ebob Agbortabot Bissong, Carlson Mbah, Frank Eric Tatsing Foka, Henri-Lucien Kamga, Spectrum of Uropathogens and Antimicrobial Susceptibility in Clinically Diagnosed Cases of Urinary Tract Infection in the Bamenda Regional Hospital, Cameroon, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 19-24. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20170502.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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