Volume 6, Issue 2, March 2018, Page: 37-43
Assessment of the Knowledge, Attitudes and Perception of Potential Occupational Hazards by Automobile Workers in Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria
Olaiya Paul Abiodun, Department of Public Health, Central University of Nicaragua, Guyana, South America
Samson Olusegun Aturaka, Department of Public Health, Texila American University, Guyana, South America
Okareh Oladapo, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria
Justin Nwofe, Department of Public Health, University of South Wale, Wales, United Kingdom
Abiodun Abiola, Department of Medical Laboratory Services, Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria
Omotola Olushola, Department of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom
Omotola Teniola, Department of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom
Received: Oct. 25, 2017;       Accepted: Jan. 6, 2018;       Published: Mar. 15, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20180602.11      View  1330      Downloads  62
Abstract
The objective of this study is to assess the knowledge and perception of Automobile workers on the occupational hazards in their workplaces and to identify their attitudes and safety practices towards protecting themselves from these hazards. A descriptive cross- sectional design and stratified sampling technique were utilized to identify the automobile workers/respondents. A structured questionnaire was used for data collection and it covered areas like social demographics, knowledge and perception of potential hazards, attitude and safety practices employed by both Automobile Mechanics (AMs) and Automobile Spray Painters (ASPs) to avoid hazards. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS version 21. Findings showed that there was statistically significant association between level of knowledge, attitude, perception of spray painters and mechanics based on their level of education. Also there was statistically significant association between level of knowledge, attitude, perception of spray painters and mechanics based on their work experience in relation to safety measures (p<0.05). However, there was no statistical significant difference in the knowledge of spray painters and mechanics about PPE as it can be generally rated poor (<50%), P>0.05). The p value for each of the tested parameter (>0.05) also shows clearly that there was no significant difference in the knowledge of both the Automobile spray printer and the Mechanics. There is need for regular training on safety guidelines and enforcement of standard/universal safety practices by automobile workers so as to reduce potential occupational hazards.
Keywords
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), Automobile Mechanics (AMs), Automobile Spray Painters (ASPs)
To cite this article
Olaiya Paul Abiodun, Samson Olusegun Aturaka, Okareh Oladapo, Justin Nwofe, Abiodun Abiola, Omotola Olushola, Omotola Teniola, Assessment of the Knowledge, Attitudes and Perception of Potential Occupational Hazards by Automobile Workers in Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2018, pp. 37-43. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20180602.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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