Volume 7, Issue 5, September 2019, Page: 79-84
Association Between Family History and the Onset Age of Essential Hypertension in Han Population in Shanghai China
Anle Li, Jiading District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
Qian Peng, Jiading District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
Yueqin Shao, Jiading District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
Yiying Zhang, Jiading District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
Xiang Fang, Jiading District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
Received: Aug. 1, 2019;       Accepted: Aug. 23, 2019;       Published: Sep. 5, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20190705.14      View  94      Downloads  24
Abstract
Genetic factor is one of important influencing factors of essential hypertension, and family history (FH) is an important marker of genetic factors. To explore the association between family history and the onset age of essential hypertension in Han population in Shanghai China. According to l:l matched pairs design, 342 cases of hypertension and 342 controls were selected and investigate their nuclear family members in the case-control study. The diagnostic information of hypertension in all relatives of these two groups was investigated. The method of genetic epidemiology research was used to explore the effect of family history. The average prevalence of hypertension was 23.32%. The prevalence of hypertension of first-degree relatives was 33.99%; the prevalence of second- degree relatives was 17.60%; the prevalence of third-degree relatives was 13.51%. All prevalence of hypertension of case group relatives were significantly higher than that of control group relatives. The average onset age in population with positive FH is 48.74±11.16 years old, and the average onset age in population with negative FH is 54.38±9.87 years old. The difference about two FH groups showed statistically significant (t=4.589, P<0.001). The average onset age of offspring with father, mother, grandpa, grandma, maternal grandpa or maternal grandma positive was respectively 48.42± 11.16, 49.16±11.12, 39.55±11.95, 39.88±11.90, 43.67±9.77 or 43.64±10.21 years old; and the average onset age of children with father, mother, grandpa, grandma, maternal grandpa or maternal grandma negative was respectively 51.90± 10.81, 51.17±11.04, 51.07±10.59, 51.08±10.60, 50.50±11.09 or 50.57±11.06 years old. The difference about two groups showed statistically significant. Family history has a positive effect on the occurrence of hypertension, and lead to earlier age of onset of offspring. The effects are different among parent and grandparent in Han in Shanghai China.
Keywords
Hypertension, Family History, Onset Age, Effect
To cite this article
Anle Li, Qian Peng, Yueqin Shao, Yiying Zhang, Xiang Fang, Association Between Family History and the Onset Age of Essential Hypertension in Han Population in Shanghai China, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 7, No. 5, 2019, pp. 79-84. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20190705.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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