Volume 8, Issue 2, March 2020, Page: 11-17
Assessment of Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Associated Factors Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care Service in Bishoftu Town, South East, Ethiopia
Dagaga Kenea, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Arsi University, Asella, Ethiopia
Firaol Lemessa, Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Arsi University, Asella, Ethiopia
Received: Apr. 1, 2020;       Accepted: Apr. 21, 2020;       Published: May 15, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20200802.12      View  147      Downloads  128
Abstract
Background: Hepatitis B virus infection is one of the serious public health problems in the world particularly in a developing country. It is transmitted from person to person by anybody fluid commonly through sexual intercourse. Hepatitis B virus infection has serious effects on both pregnant women and infants. Objective: This study aims to assess the magnitude of Hepatitis B virus infection and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal care service in Bishoftu town. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted involving a total of 276 pregnant women attending antenatal care service at Bishoftu town from July 17 - August 17, 2019. A systematic random sampling technique was used to select the study subjects. A blood sample was drawn from each study subject to testing for Hepatitis B surface antigen and confirmation for positive results was done by an enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. Completed data from questionnaires were entered into Epi info version 7 and, exported and analyzed by SPSS Version 21. Descriptive statistics were carried out to estimate the characteristics of the participants. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with Hepatitis B virus infection. Odds ratios at 95% confidence interval were calculated. P-value < 0.05 was considered as a significant. Result: The magnitude of Hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women attending antenatal care services in Bishoftu town was 18 (6.5%). Study subject with the previous history of the dental procedure [AOR=4.79, 95%CI (1.41 -16.23)], body tattooing [AOR=3.18, 95%CI (1.01-10.03)] and those with a multi-sexual partner [AOR=5.19, 95%CI (1.09-24.60)] were known to have a significant association with Hepatitis B virus infection. Conclusion and Recommendation: This study indicates that Bishoftu town has intermediate endemicity of Hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women. Regarding the risk factors, pregnant women with a dental procedure, body tattooing, and multi-sexual partner were found to be at risk of Hepatitis B virus infection. To minimize the higher risk exposure status of mothers, increasing awareness and public health education on the mode of Hepatitis B virus transmission, high-risk behaviors and methods of prevention are recommended.
Keywords
Hepatitis B Virus, Pregnant Women, Associated Factor
To cite this article
Dagaga Kenea, Firaol Lemessa, Assessment of Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Associated Factors Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care Service in Bishoftu Town, South East, Ethiopia, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 11-17. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20200802.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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