Volume 3, Issue 1-1, January 2015, Page: 68-73
Perspectives of Continuing Formal Education among Nurses in Selected Secondary Healthcare Facilitiesin Northern Nigeria
Aliyu Adamu, Niger State College of Nursing Sciences, Bida, Nigeria
Ibrahim Taiwo Adeleke, Department of Health Information, Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Nigeria; Centre for Health & Allied Researches,Bida, Nigeria; Health Informatics Research Initiatives in Nigeria,Bida, Nigeria
Danjuma Aliyu, Department of Nursing Services, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria
Tawheed Mahmud, Niger State College of Nursing Sciences, Bida, Nigeria
Received: Dec. 31, 2014;       Accepted: Jan. 8, 2015;       Published: Jan. 23, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajhr.s.2015030101.20      View  3029      Downloads  287
Abstract
Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine registered nurses’ perception of continuing formal education (CFE). Methods: A quota sampling was used to recruit 100 registered nurses who attended a mandatory continuing professional development programs in two different locations (Minna and New Bussa) in Niger state, Nigeria. Results:The findings from the study reveal that the participants’ major reasons for undertaking continuing formal education were to be current in their specialty (86.5%), to develop proficiency necessary to meet patients' needs (95.8%) and to improve self-confidence (95.8%). The result also shows that the major motivating factors identified by the participants to undertake CFE were encouragement from management (95.8%) and funding supports (94.8%). Major barriers to undertaking CFE among nurses in this study were lack of funding (97.9%) and family roles of child bearing and caring (94.8%).Conclusion: The need for nurses to undertake CFE is well recognized by the participants in this study. However, the managers of healthcare systemsneed to provide nurses with the necessary supports to enable them attend such programs in order to enhance their productivity.
Keywords
Continuing Formal Education, Continuing Professional Education, Nurses, Nigeria
To cite this article
Aliyu Adamu, Ibrahim Taiwo Adeleke, Danjuma Aliyu, Tawheed Mahmud, Perspectives of Continuing Formal Education among Nurses in Selected Secondary Healthcare Facilitiesin Northern Nigeria, American Journal of Health Research. Special Issue: Health Information Technology in Developing Nations: Challenges and Prospects Health Information Technology . Vol. 3, No. 1-1, 2015, pp. 68-73. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.s.2015030101.20
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